Walking on Trails: How Does it Help Preserve Nature?

Walking is good not only for the heart but also for the environment. If you do this low-impact physical activity on trails, parks, or reserves, you’ll be able to maximize its health and environmental benefits.

Here are some of the environmental benefits of walking that will inspire you to walk more often.

Reduced carbon footprint

When you drive, your vehicle consumes much fuel—which is a nonrenewable resource—and produces toxic emissions that worsen air pollution. But when you walk, the only fuel you need to keep going is food and water. So when you’re in a situation when you’ll have to choose between driving and walking, go for the eco-friendlier choice! Aside from saving the environment, walking also allows you to save on fuel costs.

Better appreciation and respect for the environment

You’ll enjoy being one with nature, which makes you appreciate the beauty of your surroundings as you take your steps. What could be more relaxing and therapeutic than the fresh air, lush trees and grass, the birds chirping, and all the natural wonders?

Increased environmental awareness

Walking on trails teaches you about the impact of your actions on the environment, training you to become more disciplined and responsible for things as simple as disposing of your trash properly.

It also compels you to make sure that you minimize harm or damage you may cause to the environment. Here are the simple ways to achieve that while walking on trails:

  • If you’re going to walk with a pet, check the rules and restrictions of the trail management, as pets might not be allowed to enter.
  • Avoid wandering off the trail. If you stay on the trail, you won’t cause erosion and damage to plants.
  • Take home your trash and don’t throw garbage anywhere on the trail.
  • Respect all native wildlife in the trail. Don’t touch them. When you take pictures of animals, turn off the flash.

When you walk more often than you drive, you can save Mother Nature in your own simple ways.

Image source: www.fix.com

5 Environment-Friendly Equestrian Travel Tips that Every Horseback Rider Must Remember

By itself, horseback riding is an eco-friendly alternative to driving a noisy ATV when you’re going on a trail adventure. But did you know that you can make that activity even safer for the environment?

Here are the ways to make sure that your ride is good for the environment when you’re exploring a trail:

1. Cut down on waste

Bring reusable cookware, utensils, and container so that you won’t have to dispose of any trash when you go horseback riding. Instead of bringing water in a disposable plastic bottle, opt for a reusable water container. Use an eco-friendly soap as well to avoid chemicals to pollute the soil, lakes, and rivers on the trail.

2. Tie up and graze your horse using low-impact techniques

Never tie your horse to trees or bushes because it can damage them. Also, avoid grazing your horse near bodies of water like a river or lake. Instead, use a lower-impact technique such as picketing or hobbling to secure your riding buddy without harming anything on the trail.

3. Pick a local guide

Support the locals who practice sustainable and responsible eco-tourism by getting the services of a local guide.

4. Keep your horse’s hooves clean

Before you enter a trail, check your horse’s hooves to make sure they’re clean and won’t cause the spread of weeds and plant diseases.

5. Respect nature and wildlife

As you go riding with your horse, be quiet and just enjoy the beautiful view without yelling so that you don’t disturb the animals living there. Keep your distance from the animals you meet on your way, and resist the temptation to feed them.

When you’re on a horseback riding vacation, be mindful of your surroundings and your actions. May these five horseback travel tips guide you through your entire experience without harming nature.…

How to Minimize Your Environmental Impact When Biking: 6 Trail Etiquette Rules to Observe

Each year, motor vehicles emit over 80% of carbon monoxide and 30% of carbon dioxide in America. This makes biking a more environment-friendly option than driving a car. If you bike more often than you drive, then you’re taking the first few steps to save the environment.

On the other hand, riding a bicycle can have a negative environmental impact as well in the form of soil erosion and damage to vegetation. But fortunately, there are ways to minimize the potential harm that biking can cause. The International Mountain Bike Association developed trail etiquette rules to promote environmental and social responsibility among bikers.

  1. Don’t leave any trace. Stay on existing trails—they’re made for a good reason: to protect vulnerable muddy, wet, and vegetated trails against damage. This also means you shouldn’t create new trails.
  2. Don’t scare animals. Wild animals can easily be frightenedby a loud noise and a sudden motion. So be conscious of your movements and be careful when passing by horses so that you don’t disturb their peace.
  3. Don’t litter. Keep the trail clean by not throwing your trash anywhere. If you have trash, better take it home.
  4. Don’t go biking when it’s raining. During bad weather, the trail can get wet and muddy. Tires can damage tracks by eroding the soil, so it’s best to cancel your plan in such a condition.
  5. Respect the plants and wildlife. Bike carefully so that you won’t hit and cause damage to anything on the trail.
  6. Keep your bike clean. Before you take out your bike for a ride on a trail, make sure that it’s free of dirt, especially the tires. In doing so, you’ll avoid spreading plant diseases and weeds.

It doesn’t take much effort to help minimize the negative effects of biking on the environment—all it takes to be eco-friendly is to have discipline, mindfulness, and genuine care for nature.…